Official report: Dutch royal family owns stolen Nazi painting

Painting was stolen during Nazi occupation of the Netherlands during World War II.

By REUTERS
March 31, 2015 16:12
Amsterdam

A TOURIST takes a picture of one of the reproductions by the Dutch painter Rembrandt van Rijn at Magna Plaza shopping center in Amsterdam.. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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AMSTERDAM - The Dutch Royal Family owns a painting by a Dutch master that was looted during by the Nazis during Germany's occupation of the Netherlands in World War Two, according to a report published on Tuesday.

"One painting was found where there were indications of involuntary loss of possession during the German occupation," the government said in a statement after an inquiry commissioned by the Royal Family that examined tens of thousands of paintings in the Royal Collection.

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Officials had contacted the heirs of the original owner, who was not named, to arrange the return of "The Hague Forest with a View of Huis ten Bosch Palace", by the 17th century painter Joris van der Haagen.

The work was bought for the Royal Collection by Queen Juliana, grandmother of reigning King Willem-Alexander.

The inquiry found that another painting in the collection, "Landscape with St. Hubert", whose provenance had been regarded as doubtful, was not stolen.

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