German organizations that combat antisemitism face uncertain future

Exit, along with multiple other organizations combating extremism, is funded through Germany's "Live Democracy!" program, which made headlines when it said the budget would be cut by 8 million euros.

GRAVES DESECRATED by vandals with Nazi swastikas and antisemitic slogans are seen in the Jewish cemetery of Weyhers, near the western German town of Ebersburg in 2005 (photo credit: FABRIZIO BENSCH / REUTERS)
GRAVES DESECRATED by vandals with Nazi swastikas and antisemitic slogans are seen in the Jewish cemetery of Weyhers, near the western German town of Ebersburg in 2005
(photo credit: FABRIZIO BENSCH / REUTERS)
The German group Exit, helps former Neo-Nazis reform and remove themselves from their extremist community, may not be running for much longer. 
The program has been running for 20 years, but it has not been given confirmation that it will receive the 250,000 Euros in funding from the government it needs to continue operating. 
Bernd Wagner, the founder, says neo-Nazi's try to track "some of them [former neo-Nazis] down and even send them death threats." He says it's extremely important the group is able to get their funding and help protect and council the former Nazis. 
The German government promised Exit that the organization would receive long term funding six years ago. However, Wagner says nothing came out of the promise and feels like he can't take the governments seriously. 
Exit, along with multiple other organizations combating extremism, is funded through Germany's "Live Democracy!" program, which recently made headlines when it said the 2020 budget would be cut by 8 million euros. After last Wednesday's deadly antisemitic attack in Halle, a new announcement came saying the budget cuts wouldn't happen. 
Germany's Family Ministry added the Live Democracy! would receive 115 million euros for their budget next year, which is the same amount it was given in 2019. The ministry said "these additional funds are aimed at addressing present challenges, and further organizations active in this field will be supported," according to DW. 
However, many organizations are still concerned about their future because the German government only provides three to five years worth of funding and then the organizations must re-apply for funding. The government has no long-term financial support plan for these organizations fighting racism and antisemitism. 
There are no guarantees for these non-profits and organizations, so their employees aren't sure they'll still have a job by January 2020. 
The red tape makes it hard for these organizations to keep staff and make long term plans. Now they are calling on lawmakers to act.
According to Germany's Interior Ministry, the number of antisemitic crimes has increased over the past four years and by 2018 climbed to nearly 2,000 attacks - about five attacks per day.
Now these groups are demanding that the government act and guarantee long-term funding for well-established organizations.

DW.com contributed to this report