Double, double toil and trouble: Exploring modern-day witches

People may buy into magic in private, but many sectors of the modern world don’t tend to embrace such beliefs, viewing them as ridiculous or weak.

By RACHEL MYERSON
September 28, 2017 09:44
Age-old superstitions: Amulets and talismans from the ‘Angels and Demons Jewish Magic Through the Ag

Age-old superstitions: Amulets and talismans from the ‘Angels and Demons Jewish Magic Through the Ages’ exhibition at the Bible Lands Museum, Jerusalem.. (photo credit: BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM))

Over the past few months, I’ve been researching the presence of magic in Israel. I’ve found, in short, that it is everywhere, in almost every demographic, regardless of religion, age, background or education. After exploring common manifestations of sorcery in two prior articles, such as practices relating to the evil eye and divination, the third and final installment will investigate the main ways that magic is expressed in the modern day, particularly within people or parts of society who consider themselves “immune” to any supernatural influences.

Superstition
As I was researching this piece, it was superstitions that flew at me from all directions; one should throw away of their nail clippings thoughtfully, lest a pregnant woman step on one which would cause a miscarriage, hiccupping is a sign of lying or having stolen something, flipping a cup will help to find a lost item… I could go on all day. What struck me was that many of those sharing these superstitious practices that dictate aspects of their daily lives were die-hard atheists and skeptics who failed to associate their superstitions with magic.

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