Tzipi Livni named a 2019 Fisher Family Fellow

"I'm happy for the opportunity that was given to me to share my experience as a decision-maker in the Israeli cabinet and as chief negotiator for peace with the students at Harvard Kennedy School."

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September 26, 2019 16:56
1 minute read.
Tzipi Livni at a Knesset debate on the Nation-State Law, August 8, 2018

Tzipi Livni at a Knesset debate on the Nation-State Law, August 8, 2018. (photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM)

WASHINGTON – Tzipi Livni, former foreign minister deputy prime minister, was named on Wednesday as a 2019 Fisher Family Fellow at the Future of Diplomacy Project at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

Livni will be at Harvard from September through November and will deliver a public address, lead a study group on the peace process and participate in a series of events and book talks with other members of the Harvard community, according to a statement from the Belfer Center. Livni will also advise the expansion of Harvard’s Palestinian-Israeli Leadership Initiative, which is “aimed at training the next generation of activists and politicians committed to making lasting peace a reality,” according to the center.

“I’m happy for the opportunity that was given to me to share my experience as a decision-maker in the Israeli cabinet and as chief negotiator for peace with the students at Harvard Kennedy School,” Livni told The Jerusalem Post. She added that she “would like to discuss and share ideas on the geopolitical situation with the distinguished scholars and fellows at the Belfer Center.”

“Tzipi Livni has had an extraordinary career in Israeli politics,” said Prof. Nicholas Burns, faculty director of the Future of Diplomacy Project. “Her commitment to public service and to peace is well-known.”

Livni served as the chief negotiator in the last two rounds of negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians and is considered as a strong supporter of the two-state solution. She retired from the Knesset before April’s election, while she served as chair of the Hatnua Party. When she announced her intention to retire, she said that she would do so in order to avoid costing the center-left bloc votes after the split between Hatnua and Labor – the two parties that ran together in the 2015 elections as the Zionist Union.



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