The underpinnings of knowledge: Initiating an educational revolution

In the solar-powered classrooms, Ugandan pupils use Simbi technology in conjunction with micro computers loaded with 64 GB of educational materials, everything from Ted Talks to Khan Academy.

By ARIEL DOMINIQUE HENDELMAN
October 11, 2017 11:24
CHILDREN at the Hadassah Primary School welcome their new school bus. )

CHILDREN at the Hadassah Primary School welcome their new school bus. ). (photo credit: MICHAEL RAYMENT/PHOTOGRAPHERS WITHOUT BORDERS)

 
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Aaron Friedland’s life was always leading up to this: to start the Walking School Bus, an organization that not only provides transport for disadvantaged children in Uganda, but provides them with better nutritition and a more effective curriculum.

Born in South Africa, Friedland and his family left when he was one year old due to the danger of living there. The family moved to Vancouver, where, at a relatively young age, Friedland was diagnosed with dyslexia. Fortunately, Vancouver’s education system offered abundant support: extra lessons and tutoring helped pave the way for him to eventually go to McGill University.


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