Miss South Africa Zozibini Tunzi crowned Miss Universe

"I grew up in a world where a woman who looks like me — with my kind of skin and my kind of hair — was never considered to be beautiful," said Miss Universe Zozibini Tunzi.

Zozibini Tunzi, of South Africa, takes her first walk as Miss Universe after winning the 2019 Miss Universe pageant at Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. December 8, 2019 (photo credit: REUTERS/ELIJAH NOUVELAGE)
Zozibini Tunzi, of South Africa, takes her first walk as Miss Universe after winning the 2019 Miss Universe pageant at Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. December 8, 2019
(photo credit: REUTERS/ELIJAH NOUVELAGE)
Miss South Africa Zozibini Tunzi was crowned Miss Universe on Sunday.

"I grew up in a world where a woman who looks like me — with my kind of skin and my kind of hair — was never considered to be beautiful," CNN quoted the new Miss Universe as saying. "I think it is time that that stops today. I want children to look at me and see my face and I want them to see their faces reflected in mine."
The Miss Universe website describes Tunzi as "a passionate activist and engaged in the fight against gender based violence. She has devoted her social media campaign to changing the narrative around gender stereotypes. She is a proud advocate for natural beauty and encourages women to love themselves the way they are."
The official Miss South Africa Twitter congratulated Tunzi writing, "Our hearts are swelling with pride. You have represented South Africa with elegance, integrity and authenticity."
The page later tweeted a picture of Tunzi wearing the Miss Universe sash and crown saying, "Dear brown skinned girl, your dreams are valid."
Oprah Winfrey took to Twitter to congratulate the new Miss Universe and invite her to visit the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls (OWLAG).
"Congratulations Miss South Africa, the new Miss Universe @zozitunzi! Agree with you...leadership is the most powerful thing we should be teaching young women today. We welcome your visit to #OWLAG, our Leadership Academy for Girls,"  Winfrey tweeted.
Established in 2007 in South Africa, OWLAG now works with "academically gifted girls" in grades 8 through 12.
"We support the development of a new generation of women leaders who, by virtue of their education and service, will lead the charge to transform themselves, their communities, and the larger world around them," the organization wrote on its website.