Congresswoman denied access to mailing facility, hints at electoral fraud

“If DeJoy thinks he can just throw a bed sheet over what’s going on behind these doors, he is sadly mistaken. It looked like the post master had something to hide.”

U.S. postal service trucks sit parked at the post office in Del Mar, California (photo credit: REUTERS)
U.S. postal service trucks sit parked at the post office in Del Mar, California
(photo credit: REUTERS)
US Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz was barred on Friday by the US Postal Service police from entering two postal service processing facilities in Florida, and guards threatened to escort her off the property, NBC reported.
Schultz, a Democratic representative and a member of the House Oversight Committee, reportedly made her way to the mailing processing facilities after her office received pictures from the facilities that showed pallets of undelivered mail marked with the date July 23.
Schultz also said that union members shared with her concerning details about the conditions at the facilities, which brought her to decide and go and see what was going on for herself.
In a tweet published by the congresswoman on Friday, she shared the unusual experience and blamed the person in charge of the US Postal Service, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, while questioning his political motives.
DeJoy is considered a close ally of President Trump. Schultz raised the possibility of misconduct carried out by DeJoy ahead of the US presidential elections, stating that "mail-in ballots are vital for a safe election."
“If DeJoy thinks he can just throw a bed sheet over what’s going on behind these doors, he is sadly mistaken. It looked like the post master had something to hide,” Schultz said in a statement. “Without access to these public facilities, the public is blindfolded to the problems or fixes taking place there. DeJoy cannot delay the mail and delay oversight of these facilities,” she added.
The Postal Service has drawn criticism in past few months, after repeated instances of delayed mail, including vital deliveries such as prescription drugs and legal documents. The public uproar led to two heated congressional hearings, during which Schlutz blamed DeJoy for deliberately crippled the federal agency.
The Postal Service has commented on the incident that prevented Schultz from entering its facilities by stating that the congresswoman had not provided enough notice of her visit.
"We spoke with her staff to explain that we were unable to set up the tour on such short notice, but would be happy to accommodate her at another time," Postal Service spokeswoman Kim Fuller said. "We look forward to working with the congresswoman and her staff to arrange a visit in the near future," she added.
According to a statement given by Schultz's congressional aide to NBC, the short notice was intentional, because of fear of what might be hidden from the congresswoman's view. "We weren’t asking for permission,” the aide said.
Following the incident, Schultz said that it is her responsibility to inspect the Postal Service and its facilities, as part of the job, being member of the Oversight Committee.
"Denying Congress access to the facilities, is denying the vital public oversight of our mail system,” Schultz said.