Amazon removes Nazi propaganda movies from its platforms following protest

The giant e-commerce retailer removed 23 out of 30 Nazi propaganda films from its platforms following a protest led by the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

"Der ewige Jude" - "Theeternal Jew" movie poster  (photo credit: WIKIPEDIA)
"Der ewige Jude" - "Theeternal Jew" movie poster
(photo credit: WIKIPEDIA)

Amazon has just removed 23 out of 30 Nazi propaganda films that were either for sale in Amazon's online portal or available for streaming on its Amazon Prime video network following a protest headed by the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

The anti-discrimination advocacy group Americans Against Anti-Semitism had first alerted the Simon Wiesenthal Center. SWC's Associate Dean and Global Social Action Director, Rabbi Abraham Cooper, wrote a letter to Amazon's CEO to Jeff Bezos to address the Nazi films that were available for sale or streaming in their entirety without any disclaimer or editorial content regarding its falsehood. The corpus included The Eternal Jew (1940) as well as films made by key Nazi propaganda director Leni Riefenstahl. 
“These films should be viewed – if at all – in history class where educators can expose the lies of Nazi Germany, its violent racist ideology, and its genocidal hatred of the Jewish people. These films helped create and sustain Jew-hatred which directly led to the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” and the mass murder of 6 million innocent Jews during WWII,” stated Cooper. 
The letter added: “In just a few days, January 20th will mark 80 years to the day that 15 German government Ministers of State, among them 8 PhDs and sons of clergy, voted unanimously to murder every Jew within reach of the Nazi Third Reich. In addition, January 27th will mark International Holocaust Remembrance Day, with formal ceremonies at the United Nations and Auschwitz.”
Amazon.com's logo is seen at Amazon Japan's office building in Tokyo, Japan, August 8, 2016. (credit: KIM KYUNG-HOON/FILE PHOTO/ REUTERS)Amazon.com's logo is seen at Amazon Japan's office building in Tokyo, Japan, August 8, 2016. (credit: KIM KYUNG-HOON/FILE PHOTO/ REUTERS)