Aviv Matzah Bakery produces 20-foot long mega-matzah

The well-known Aviv Matzah Bakery decided to bake what they believe to be the biggest matzah in Israel and to bring it to the President’s Residence.

WINE AND the four glasses: As much a part of Passover as the matzah. (photo credit: GALIL MOUNTAIN WINERY)
WINE AND the four glasses: As much a part of Passover as the matzah.
(photo credit: GALIL MOUNTAIN WINERY)

Passover has been with the Jewish people for so many centuries that it would be old hat in the full sense of the expression were it not for creative individuals who are forever dreaming up something new to add to holiday customs and atmosphere. Matzah, the crisp unleavened bread (more like a cracker) that is eaten on Passover has developed into different shapes, sizes and flavors totally unknown to the Children of Israel in the immediate aftermath of their exodus from Egypt.

As far as matzah bakeries go, it’s not only the flavor but also the size. The well-known Aviv Matzah Bakery owned by the Wolf family has been producing matzot for 138 years, and this year the factory’s management decided to bake what they believe to be the biggest matzah in Israel and to bring it to the President’s Residence.

With more than 119,00 perforations, the matzah is six meters (nearly 20 feet) long, 106 cm. (42 inches) wide, four mm. (less than ¼ inch) thick and weighs around six kg (approximately 13 lbs.). It was produced from seven kg. of flour and three liters of water and took three hours to bake, whereas a regular matzah takes only a few minutes, and requires only one baker.

The mega-matzah was baked by some 20 of the bakery plant’s employees and required certain changes in the production line in order to meet the new challenge.

The Wolf children, who have been in and out of the matzah bakery since they were toddlers, came with adult family representatives to the President’s Residence on Sunday, to tell President Isaac Herzog and his wife, Michal, about the giant matzah and the history of the bakery.

Shmurah Matzah.  (credit: Wikimedia Commons)Shmurah Matzah. (credit: Wikimedia Commons)

The children, who are junior matzah bakers, are seventh generation bakers in their family.

Among the adults was David Wolf, a fifth-generation matzah baker, son of the factory’s deputy CEO Roie Wolf.

Herzog professed a special liking for matzah brei and asked the children about their favorite matzah dishes. Itamar, 11, said that he loves the chocolate-coated matzah that his father makes; and Rom, eight, said that he too is especially fond of chocolate-coated matzah.

Alma, eight, told the Herzogs that every year the family distributes matzah to the faculty at her school in celebration of Passover.

“You’re the seventh generation at the factory. You’re the future, it’s incredible,” Herzog told the children.

The president was astonished by the large matzah and declared, “We are very happy to see the longest matzah in Israel and maybe even the world, as you at your factory celebrate 138 years of matzah-baking. He wished the people of Israel a wonderful Seder night, matzah-eating and a kosher and happy Passover!

But he stopped short at saying the obvious – namely that matzah baking and eating is a very crumby business.