Opera singers sing to protest layoffs

"Similar to the Hebrew slaves about whom the work was originally written, the choir singers also mourn the destruction of their temple, the opera house."

Singers from the opera chorus outside the Israeli Opera in Tel Aviv Wednesday (photo credit: Courtesy)
Singers from the opera chorus outside the Israeli Opera in Tel Aviv Wednesday
(photo credit: Courtesy)
In protest of the layoff of 55 out of 62 opera singers, singers from the Israel Opera Choir gathered outside the Opera House to perform the Aria of the Hebrew Slaves from Verdi’s Nabucco. The performance was under the direction of the Israeli Opera's conductor, Yishai Steckler and the retired choir conductor.
"Similar to the Hebrew slaves about whom the work was originally written, the choir singers also mourn the destruction of their temple, the opera house," the group said in a statement. "Slaves are those who earn an average of NIS 50,000 a year, and are fired by those who earn about NIS 50,000 a month.
Only yesterday, Culture and Sport Minister Chili Tropper pledged financial aid - NIS 10 million - to the Israeli Opera.
"Instead of aiding the workers themselves," the statement added, "he [Tropper] is choosing to fire [the Opera's] artists."
Just last month, the Israeli Opera announced programming for its upcoming season, all in accordance with coronavirus restrictions.
Zach Granit, general manger of the Israeli Opera, said the staff is eager to return after seven months of inactivity, they're just waiting on government approval.