Yesh Atid would win election if held today, poll says

Ra’am, Balad and Noam would not pass the electoral threshold, according to the poll.

 Campaign posters for Yair Lapid's Yesh Atid next to the Ayalon Highway in Tel Aviv, prior to the upcoming Israeli general elections, October 26, 2022.  (photo credit: JAMAL AWAD/FLASH90)
Campaign posters for Yair Lapid's Yesh Atid next to the Ayalon Highway in Tel Aviv, prior to the upcoming Israeli general elections, October 26, 2022.
(photo credit: JAMAL AWAD/FLASH90)

If a national election were held now, Yesh Atid would win 27 seats and the Likud would win 26, marking a significant turnaround since the previous election on November 1, according to a poll conducted by Panels Politics this week.

Perhaps more significantly, the current opposition parties, which have 56 seats, would win 65 seats in a new election, and the current coalition would win 55, nine seats less than its current 64.

The full results of the poll were Yesh Atid, 27; Likud, 26; National Unity, 19; Shas, 10; United Torah Judaism, seven; Otzma Yehudit, seven; Labor, five; Hadash-Ta’al, five; Religious Zionist Party, five; Yisrael Beytenu, five; and Meretz, four.

Ra’am, Balad and Noam would not pass the electoral threshold, according to the poll.

Likud would lose most seats, according to poll

Likud had the most significant loss, losing six seats. National Unity had the highest gain, adding seven seats. Yesh Atid would gain three seats, and Labor and Otzma Yehudit would add one. Meretz, which in the previous election narrowly missed the threshold, would enter the Knesset. Shas would lose one seat, and RZP would lose two.

 PRIME MINISTER Benjamin Netanyahu addresses the Likud’s faction in the Knesset, last week. Threats from the Likud Central Committee may be inserted into the selection procedure for the most important judicial institution in Israel, says the writer. (credit: OLIVIER FITOUSSI/FLASH90) PRIME MINISTER Benjamin Netanyahu addresses the Likud’s faction in the Knesset, last week. Threats from the Likud Central Committee may be inserted into the selection procedure for the most important judicial institution in Israel, says the writer. (credit: OLIVIER FITOUSSI/FLASH90)

The stark difference in the polls comes on the backdrop of widespread criticism of the current coalition over its proposed reform of the judicial system, as well as over concessions that the Likud made to its partners on matters of religion and state.

The poll included 502 participants, and the margin of error was 4.3%.