Rabbinical court appoints Devorah Eifferman in senior role

The Civil Service Commission set a goal for the rabbinical courts to have 50% of senior roles filled by women.

THE RABBINICAL court of Tel Aviv. It has been said that rabbinical courts allow men to hold back consent to divorce their wives in order to extort the women into agreeing to unfair overall terms. (photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM)
THE RABBINICAL court of Tel Aviv. It has been said that rabbinical courts allow men to hold back consent to divorce their wives in order to extort the women into agreeing to unfair overall terms.
(photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM)

The Israeli rabbinical court has appointed Devorah Eiferman as vice president of administration and human resources, achieving the goal set by the Civil Service Commission of having 50% of executive roles filled by women.

A mother of six from Beit Shemesh, Eiferman has spent 20 years in public service, beginning in the prime minister's office and most recently in the Office of Religious Affairs. She holds a BA in Public Policy and an MA in Business Management.

"After 20 years of extended professional work in the public sector and specifically religious services, I am happily entering into the administration of the rabbinical courts and with the ambitions to push forward a variety of subjects that the administration is in charge of," said Eiferman.

"I welcome the appointment of Ms. Eiferman," said the Civil Service Commission Rabbi Prof. Daniel Hershkowitz. "Her appointment fulfills the Civil Service Commission's policy regarding appropriate representation that advocates for not settling on quality, professionalism and combining all the groups that deserve appropriate representation."

THE RABBINICAL Court’s Division for Agunot in Jerusalem. (credit: MIRIAM ALSTER/FLASH90)THE RABBINICAL Court’s Division for Agunot in Jerusalem. (credit: MIRIAM ALSTER/FLASH90)

"I have no doubt that Ms. Eiferman will actualize her professional abilities and her experience in her new role and will use her personality to help the employees in the rabbinical court system," said Head of the Rabbinical Courts Rabbi David Lau Malka. "We wish her luck in fulfilling her important mission."