Egypt court overturns bans on Islamist party, Ayman Nour

By REUTERS
October 10, 2011 18:14

 
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CAIRO - An Egyptian court on Monday overturned a decision barring the formation of a political party by an Islamist group that took up arms against the state in the 1980s and 1990s.

It also overturned a decision barring presidential hopeful Ayman Nour from forming a party, saying both Nour and the Islamist group al-Gam'aa al-Islamiyya "met the conditions stipulated in the parties law," state news agency MENA said.

The court rulings come ahead of a parliamentary election that starts in November, the first such vote since Hosni Mubarak was ousted from power.

The ruling paves the way for more strands of Egyptian society to take part in formal politics as the army tries to steer the country peacefully towards democratic civilian rule.

Egyptian law bans parties based on religion, but groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood have been allowed to form parties because they say they take Islam as a "reference" point and do not seek to impose Islamic sharia law.

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