German Jews hide Jewish magazine for fear of anti-Semitic attacks

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February 20, 2015 20:45

 
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Berlin - Germany’s largest Jewish community in the capital city removed its logo on envelopes containing its monthly magazine to protect members from anti-Semitic attacks.

In a statement to The Jerusalem Post on Friday, the Berlin Jewish community spokesman Ilan Kiesling said, “Despite considerably higher costs, the community’s executive board decided to send the community magazine in a neutral envelope, in order to reduce the hostility toward our more than 10,000 members. Many community members were thinking about cancelling their subscription.”

The security measure to send the magazine “Jewish Berlin” in an unmarked envelope was formulated as part of new security protocols with the police and the security department of the Berlin Jewish community.

“It is a sad reality that a large part of Jewish life for years has taken place behind bulletproof glass, barbed wire and security access controls,” said Kiesling.

He added the attacks in Paris and Copenhagen, which resulted in Islamic terrorists killing five Jews, have created a new situation leading to “great insecurity” among community members.

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