Kashrut certification pulled from PA West Bank factories over ‘security concerns'

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February 8, 2016 05:26
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Several food factories based in Palestinian-administered areas of the West Bank whose products are certified as kosher and are imported into the Israeli market have lost their kashrut certification since the beginning of the year because the security situation in those areas has prevented kashrut inspectors from conducting regular inspections.

Factory owners, however, argue that there has been no change in the ability of inspectors to gain access to the food plants.

Several food factories in the Nablus industrial zone produce kosher food products that are subsequently brought into Israel, similar to kosher food items imported from other parts of the world.

For food to be marked as kosher, it must be certified as such by the Chief Rabbinate though other kashrut-licensing authorities can provide supervision services as long as they do not use the term “kashrut.”

The Ayesh Tehina factory, owned by an Israeli company and based in the Nablus industrial zone has been operating for many years. It is supervised by the “Badatz Hatam Sofer” kashrut-certification authority with the approval of the Chief Rabbinate, but the Chief Rabbinate kashrut certificate was not renewed at the beginning of 2016, and the owners were not informed about the cessation of the rabbinate’s approval.

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