Study shows rapid deforestation in Malaysia

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
February 1, 2011 07:54
1 minute read.

AMSTERDAM  — New satellite imagery showed Malaysia was destroying forests more than three times faster than all of Asia combined, and its carbon-rich peat soils of the Sarawak coast were being stripped even faster, according to a study released Tuesday.

The report commissioned by the Netherlands-based Wetlands International said Malaysia was uprooting an average 2 percent of the rain forest a year on Sarawak, its largest state on the island of Borneo, or nearly 10 percent over the last five years. Most of it is being converted to palm oil plantations, it said.

The deforestation rate for all of Asia during the same period was 2.8 percent, it said.

In the last five years, 353,000 hectares (872,263 acres) of Malaysia's peatlands were deforested, or one-third of the swamps which have stored carbon from decomposed plants for millions of years.

"We never knew exactly what was happening in Malaysia and Borneo," said Wetlands spokesman Alex Kaat. "Now we see there is a huge expansion (of deforestation) with annual rates that are beyond imagination."

The study was carried out by SarVision, a satellite monitoring and mapping company that originated with scientists at Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

"Total deforestation in Sarawak is 3.5 times as much as that for entire Asia, while deforestation of peat swamp forest is 11.7 times as much," the report said.


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