Iran Jewish MP calls US assassination of Soleimani 'a criminal act'

'Members of the Jewish community, like the rest of the Iranian society, are present and will stand for the ideals of the revolution.'

Iranian Jews pray at the Abrishami synagogue at Palestine street in Tehran December 24, 2015.. (photo credit: RAHEB HOMAVANDI/REUTERS)
Iranian Jews pray at the Abrishami synagogue at Palestine street in Tehran December 24, 2015..
(photo credit: RAHEB HOMAVANDI/REUTERS)
Representative of the Iranian Jewish community at the parliament, MP Siamak Moreh Sedq condemned the US strike on IRGC Quds Force commander Qasem Soleimani and said "no one can attack Iran's national interests without punishment," FarsNews reported.
"The criminal act of the United States, which was the assassination of martyr Soleimani and some effective members of the resistance, demonstrates the violence and cruelty that cannot be accepted within the framework of human behaviors at all," Sedq claimed.
Representatives of the Iranian Jewish community visited the home of Soleimani to pay their condolences after he was assassinated in a US strike on Thursday night.
One of the members of the Jewish community in Tehran told the Israeli haredi (ultra-Orthodox) news outlet Bahadrei Hadarim that “many Jews took part in the funeral” and that members of the community, including the chief rabbi of Tehran, visited Soleimani’s house to pay their condolences.
 
Representatives of the Zoroastrian and Christian communities, also minority religions in Iran, visited the home as well, according to pictures posted by the semi-official Iranian Students News Agency.
A letter by Solomon Kohan Sadegh, a representative of the Jewish community, stated that “members of the Jewish community, like the rest of the Iranian society, are present and will stand for the ideals of the Revolution,” according to ISNA.
Rani Amrani of Israel’s Farsi-language RadioRan explained that it’s “very important” for Jews and other minority groups in Iran to condemn Soleimani’s death due to fears about antisemitism, according to Israel Hayom.
“Often, during the protests [against] Jerusalem Day, the Jews go out and take part for fear of being attacked. In their hearts, they love Israel,” said Amrani. “They are in a situation in which they have to prove they have no links to Zionism.”