Unique valve transplant performed successfully at Hadassah Hospital, first time in Israel

The operation that was required had only been done in a few major centers around the world.

 Pictured from the right: Dr. Gabby Elbaz-Greener, Dr. David Planer, Prof. Ronen Beeri, Director of the Echocardiography Unit and a Senior Anesthesiologist, Dr. Amit Korach, Dr. Tamer Abu Jreis. (photo credit: HADASSAH SPOKESPERSON)
Pictured from the right: Dr. Gabby Elbaz-Greener, Dr. David Planer, Prof. Ronen Beeri, Director of the Echocardiography Unit and a Senior Anesthesiologist, Dr. Amit Korach, Dr. Tamer Abu Jreis.
(photo credit: HADASSAH SPOKESPERSON)

An extremely complex aortic valve transplant was performed at Hadassah University Medical Center, Ein Kerem, on Friday for a 76-year-old patient for whom all the common procedures that the hospital usually provides did not suit the treatment that was required.

The patient arrived at Hadassah a few weeks ago with a severe heart defect and suffered from a severe vascular disease.

“Until two decades ago, access to patients who needed aortic valve replacement was a surgical approach that involved opening the chest and a long and difficult recovery," said Dr. David Flanner, director of the catheterization department at Hadassah.

"The patient who came to us needed the valve transplant urgently and all the accepted and common options did not suit him due to various diseases from which he suffered. The case presented us with a real challenge and we realized we needed to think outside the box in order to save his life," Flanner continued.

The operation that was required had only been done in a few major centers around the world, where multiple surgeons are needed for the procedure. Both the patient and his family were notified of the unusual operation. With the lack of alternatives, it was decided that the operation would be performed.

Hadassah-University Medical Center, in Jerusalem’s Ein Kerem (credit: Courtesy)Hadassah-University Medical Center, in Jerusalem’s Ein Kerem (credit: Courtesy)

Flanner said that since the operation succeeded without any complications, the procedure will now be another treatment option for similar critically ill patients.

The patient has since been released for rehabilitation.