Electronic tracking of domestic abuser approved in preliminary vote

The bill, if it passes fully, would require confirmed domestic abusers for whom a protection order has been issued to wear electronic tracking bracelets.

 Protesters outside the Talmon Prison where Real estate promoter Alon Kastiel is being early released. Kastiel had been charged with sexual harrassment and rape, after 12 complaints by different women. June 27, 2022.  (photo credit: David Cohen/Flash90)
Protesters outside the Talmon Prison where Real estate promoter Alon Kastiel is being early released. Kastiel had been charged with sexual harrassment and rape, after 12 complaints by different women. June 27, 2022.
(photo credit: David Cohen/Flash90)

The Public Security Committee has passed in a preliminary reading a bill which, if it passes fully, would require confirmed domestic abusers for whom a protection order has been issued to wear electronic tracking bracelets.

The bill would allow the court to order the use of electronic restraint on a person who has committed a violent offense against a family member based on a risk assessment, thus allowing women affected by violence to feel safer and more protected. 

Such restraint would allow victims to continue to lead their lives.

How did the bill come to be? 

The bill was set forth in the presence of committee chair Merav Ben-Ari (Yesh Atid) and was set forth by Efrat Rayten (Labor) and Aida Touma-Sliman (Joint List), among others.

 Committee chairman Merav Ben Ari leads Internal security committee meeting at the Knesset, the Israeli Parliament in Jerusalem on June 13, 2022. (credit: YONATAN SINDEL/FLASH90) Committee chairman Merav Ben Ari leads Internal security committee meeting at the Knesset, the Israeli Parliament in Jerusalem on June 13, 2022. (credit: YONATAN SINDEL/FLASH90)

This, after a number of women's rights organizations such as WIZO and the Women's Lobby, united and wrote a letter demanding that Israel's MKs leave their political considerations at the door and join to fight violence against women.

"The organizations call on those responsible for the agreements to ensure the continuity of the legislation and to approve the bill on first reading in the Knesset plenum before it is dissolved," the organizations said. 

Why is the bill so important?

Families that had fallen victim to such aggressors came forward and spoke via Zoom and in person at the committee meeting to speak about how important this bill is.

Elisheva, for example, told of her seven-year battle against her abusive ex-husband, who had violated his restraining order on numerous occasions and attempted to get close to her and her children throughout the years, even as they moved to a women's shelter and afterward.

She told of the neglect she faced at the hands of Israel Police. "They closed my case because 'the police can't find it,'" She said. "They asked me if I know where he lives, they called him my 'husband.' This is my life, this is my children's lives. This law is meant to protect us."

Liat Eshel had been stabbed multiple times by her abusive ex and her son had been kidnapped. "I live in constant fear," she said. "I have security cameras. I need to know where he is. A restraining order isn't enough."