Most Israelis think Israeli Arabs can't have solidarity with Palestinians - ADL

The same number of people also said that flying the Palestinian flag in Israel should be illegal, an ADL survey said.

 A MAN displays a Palestinian flag across from celebrants holding Israeli flags in Jerusalem’s Old City during Jerusalem Day festivities, last week. (photo credit: JAMAL AWAD/FLASH90)
A MAN displays a Palestinian flag across from celebrants holding Israeli flags in Jerusalem’s Old City during Jerusalem Day festivities, last week.
(photo credit: JAMAL AWAD/FLASH90)

Most Israelis do not think Israeli Arabs should express solidarity with the Palestinians, according to a new survey by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL).

The survey, which was put together at the end of October 2022, was released ahead of the ADL's Israel Social Cohesion Summitt in Tel Aviv. 

But what else did the Israeli public have to say?

Arabs, Palestinians, Kahanism and political representation

Most Israelis (59%) think Israeli Arabs can't express solidarity with the Palestinians, with the same number also saying that flying the Palestinian flag in Israel should be illegal.

MK Itamar Ben-Gvir during a discussion and a vote on a bill to dissolve the Knesset, at the assembly hall of the Israeli parliament, in Jerusalem, on June 22, 2022. (credit: OLIVIER FITOUSSI/FLASH90)MK Itamar Ben-Gvir during a discussion and a vote on a bill to dissolve the Knesset, at the assembly hall of the Israeli parliament, in Jerusalem, on June 22, 2022. (credit: OLIVIER FITOUSSI/FLASH90)

Keeping with this line of questioning, respondents were also asked about the Arab sector. Over a third (34%) of Israelis think that Israeli Arabs are not integral parts of Israeli society and even more (41%) think it is a completely legitimate political view to refuse to serve in a coalition with an Arab party. Less than a third (32%) of Israelis disagree with the latter point.

This was somewhat related to another question on Kahanism, the extremist political ideology of the late Rabbi Meir Kahane, often associated with far-right religious Zionist beliefs and extreme views towards Arabs.

To many people, this is an ideology that has seemingly been renewed, thanks in large part to the efforts of figures on the far Right like Itamar Ben-Gvir

In total, 39% of Israelis think Kahanism has gained renewed legitimacy.

Regarding Israeli views on questions of religion and state, views were split.

Just over a third (38%) of Israelis support non-Orthodox conversion to Judaism and under half (49%) support an egalitarian prayer section at the Western Wall.

This supports the views of some on the Right of the political spectrum, who have long advocated for only recognizing Orthodox Judaism and being against egalitarian prayer at the Western Wall.

But a large majority bucked this trend with another topic: Marriage. In total, 65% of Israelis support civil marriage.

This is a view more in line with the more liberal-leaning Diaspora Jews around the world.

Despite this, though, a majority (60%) of Israelis still think that Diaspora Jews should be barely or completely uninvolved in Israel's decision-making process.

Israelis lose faith in the justice system

Over a third (36%) of all Israelis have said they have little to no faith in the Israeli judiciary. However, this trend was more evident with religious Israelis. In fact, 83% of haredim said they don't believe in the Israeli courts.

But some don't trust the justice system because they believe it has too much power. Specifically, over a third (36%) of Israelis, including 89% of haredim, think the Supreme Court has too much authority.

What divides and unites Israel together?

There were several factors that were held responsible for the many deep divisions in Israeli society. The biggest factors were seen as traditional media (80%), new and digital media (83%) and political leadership (92%).

However, when it comes to what unifies Israelis together, one factor has always consistently stood above the rest: The IDF. Indeed, IDF service is the most effective glue unifying Israel together.

What about haredim?

Here another one-third of Israelis thought that haredim were not an integral part of Israeli society, but this number has significantly gone down compared to last year

In addition, most Israelis (58%) don't think it is legitimate for a political party to refuse to serve in a coalition with a haredi party.