Joint List may break up due to division on conversion therapy - report

Ra'am Party leader Mansour Abbas said that the electorate who voted for the list is angry at the support some of its members have shown for the law, and are demanding the dissolution of the list.

AYMAN ODEH, leader of the Joint List, gestures as he hands out pamphlets during an an election campaign event in Tira. (photo credit: REUTERS)
AYMAN ODEH, leader of the Joint List, gestures as he hands out pamphlets during an an election campaign event in Tira.
(photo credit: REUTERS)
The Joint List has been embroiled in internal conflicts recently, following disagreements regarding the recent vote on the law banning psychologists from performing conversion therapy, which passed in a preliminary reading in the Knesset this week, Kan News reported on Saturday.
After the list's chairman, Ayman Odeh, who belongs to the Hadash Party, voted in favor of the law, Ra'am Party leader Mansour Abbas said that the existence of the Joint List depends on the behavior of its members in the near future.
Abbas further said that the electorate who voted for the list is angry at the support some of its members have shown for the law, and are demanding the dissolution of the list.
The bill was drafted by Meretz leader MK Nitzan Horowitz and passed with the support of 42 MKs against 36 who opposed. 
Israel's two first LGBTQ ministers, Amir Ohana and Itzik Shmuli, supported the proposal as the coalition's vote was split, with Blue and White and Labor voting in favor, religious parties voting against, and the Likud Party having mixed votes.
The results of the vote caused a crisis in the coalition, with the heads of the ultra-Orthodox parties sharply criticizing Blue and White and the Likud, and even declaring that they would consider their next political steps. Shas announced that party members would not participate in the plenum vote until further notice.
 
The joint list has been embroiled in internal conflicts following disagreements in the vote on the law banning conversion therapy, which passed a preliminary reading in the Knesset this week - Kan 11 reported on Saturday..
The United Torah Judaism party convened an urgent faction meeting following the vote, in which they announced that they considered themselves "free from coalition obligations" and that they had decided to advance laws on matters of religion and state.

Translated by Idan Zonshine.