Tunisia leader, Bill Clinton among Nobel nominees

By REUTERS
February 27, 2012 15:36

 
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OSLO - Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki, alleged WikiLeaks whistleblower Bradley Manning, and former US President Bill Clinton may be among the hundreds of nominees for the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize, rights activists say.

The list of nominees, which is now officially closed for this year, is secret and Nobel officials would not comment on its contents. But experts have begun speculating about who is on the list and some people eligible to nominate candidates have publicized their suggestions. The committee added the final names for consideration on Friday.

"It could well be that they look to Tunisia," veteran Nobel-watcher Jan Egeland, European director of Human Rights Watch, said on Monday after the five-member Norwegian Nobel Committee said it was considering two hundred and thirty one names.

"It's the only shining success story of the Arab Spring so far."

Marzouki, a human rights activist who became Tunisian president in December, "would symbolise the whole peaceful transition from authoritarian repression to democracy," said Egeland.

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