Pascale’s Kitchen: Passover leftovers repurposed

This week I’ve chosen to linger with the wonderful holiday feelings and at the same time use up all the leftover matzah in my pantry, before completely returning to the world of hametz.

By
May 2, 2019 08:57
Pascale’s Kitchen: Passover leftovers repurposed

MASOKI. (photo credit: PASCALE PERETZ-RUBIN AND DROR KATZ)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

I’d like to share something extraordinary with you, my readers, that I come across time and time again. You all are probably familiar with how everyone talks about getting back to their normal schedule again after a holiday has concluded. Most people go back to their regular jobs, sit in meetings, engage in their day-to-day activities as they did before the holiday began.

For me, however, the end of Passover means unpacking all of the ingredients that are forbidden to eat on the holiday and going back to preparing simpler dishes that don’t require as much investment of time or energy, and don’t bring back special memories of past holidays spent with friends and family.

And so this week I’ve chosen to linger with the wonderful holiday feelings and at the same time use up all the leftover matzah in my pantry, before completely returning to the world of hametz.

TIPascale
Matzah meal can be stored in jars that you keep next to bread crumbs. That way, the next time you prepare chicken schnitzel, you can combine the two and just add spices. The combination of the two works really well for frying.
Matzah meal comes in a few different consistencies. The finest is used for making cakes, whereas the more coarse matzah meal is great for adding to dishes such as meatballs. You can prepare your own matzah meal with leftover matzah in a food processor and decide exactly how fine you want it to be.

PASSOVER ROLLS (Credit: PASCALE PERETZ-RUBIN AND DROR KATZ)

MASOKI
This Tunisian-style matzah dish that I grew up on is typically prepared for many weeks after Passover has ended, until all the matzah has been used up.
Makes six to eight servings.

8 pieces of matzah
4 Tbsp. oil
½ head of garlic, chopped
½ tsp. harissa or spicy paprika
½ tsp. salt
½ tsp. cinnamon or 2-3 sticks of cinnamon
½ tsp. cumin
6 cups water

Heat the oil in a large pot. Add the garlic, salt, cinnamon, harissa and cumin. Stir. Add the water.
In a separate bowl, break up each matzah into four sections. Once the mixture in the pot begins to boil, add the pieces of matzah and mix gently for 10 more minutes over a medium flame. Serve hot.

PASSOVER ROLLS
I’ve tried out many Passover roll recipes over the years, and this is my absolutely favorite one. It’s so good that I continue making these rolls after Passover is over, until I’ve used up all my leftover matzah. You can use ground-up matzah or matzah meal (or a combination of the two). Make sure not to give in to your curiosity while they’re baking, though, which will prevent them from rising properly, so don’t open the oven to check on them. Also, brush them with egg wash and sprinkle with sesame seeds, if you so desire.
Makes 20 rolls.

2 cups water
1 tsp. salt
¼ cup oil
50 gr. margarine or butter
2 cups matzah meal
6 eggs
Egg wash (optional)
Beat 1 egg with 1 or 2 drops of oil
¼ cup sesame seeds

Boil water in a pot. Add salt, oil and margarine. Bring to a boil again.
Add the flour and mix until dough falls away from sides of pot. Remove from the flame and let cool. Mix every once in a while.
Add the eggs one at a time, mixing each time. Let sit for 30 minutes before forming rolls.
Wet your hands and then take a bit of dough and form small rolls. Arrange them on a tray covered with baking paper. With a scissors, make a small X on each roll.
Brush with egg wash and sprinkle with sesame seeds.
Bake for 30 minutes in an oven that has been preheated to 180°. Turn off the oven and let the rolls sit inside the oven for another 10 minutes.

MEAT-FILLED MATZAH PASTRIES (Credit: PASCALE PERETZ-RUBIN AND DROR KATZ)

MEAT-FILLED MATZAH PASTRIES
This dish is easy and quick. Fill the dumplings with any mixture you like: beef, chicken, fish, potato, or mushroom and onion. Alternatively, make them sweet and use apples, nuts and cinnamon. Serve them as is or with a spicy sauce for dipping. For sweet pastries, top with maple or chocolate syrup.
Makes six to eight servings.

Oil for frying
½ cup chopped onion
250 gr. cooked chicken, shredded
1 tsp. garlic, chopped
1 Tbsp. dill or parsley, chopped
Salt and pepper, to taste
4 pieces matzah
2 large eggs
2 Tbsp. water

Heat the oil in a large frying pan and sauté onion. Add the meat and sauté for another two to three minutes.
Add the garlic and dill. Season with salt and pepper and stir well. Let cool.
Fill a bowl with water and soak the matzah for a few seconds. Remove them and set them on a damp towel. Cover them and let them sit for 15 minutes.
Separate the filling into eight equal sections. Place filling on each of the matzah halves and then roll them up.
In a separate bowl, beat the eggs with water. Dip the rolled-up matzah in the mixture and then fry it in oil on both sides until golden brown.

CHICKEN BREAST SALAD WITH CELERY AND DRIED FRUITS (Credit: PASCALE PERETZ-RUBIN AND DROR KATZ)

CHICKEN BREAST SALAD WITH CELERY AND DRIED FRUITS
This recipe, which I received from my friend Leah Lor, can also be prepared with pastrami.
Makes eight servings.

2 celery roots
250 gr. cooked chicken breast or Turkey pastrami, cut into strips
150 gr. dried apricots, cut into thin strips
100 gr. almonds, peeled, chopped and roasted
½ cup scallions, sliced
1½ cups celery leaves, chopped finely

Sauce:
2 Tbsp. corn oil
2 Tbsp. lemon juice
4 Tbsp. orange liqueur
1 Tbsp. sugar
1 Tbsp. freshly grated ginger
½ tsp. nutmeg
Salt and pepper, to taste
½ tsp. curry powder
Cook the celery roots in water for 10 minutes until softened. Cut them into 2½-cm. strips and place them in a glass bowl. Add the chicken or pastrami pieces, apricots, almonds, onion and celery leaves.
Put all of the sauce ingredients in a jar and close the lid tightly. Shake well and pour over the salad. Mix gently and let sit for an hour, so that the flavor has time to absorb.

Translated by Hannah Hochner.

Text and styling: PASCALE PEREZ-RUBIN




Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

July 19, 2019
Could Israel replicate its automotive tech success in smart manufacturing?

By EYTAN HALON

Cookie Settings