Majority of Republicans would join a Trump-led third party

All told, some 37% of US voters from all parties said they were likely to join a Trump third party.

US PRESIDENT Donald Trump gestures as he speaks during a rally to contest the certification of the presidential election results by Congress, in Washington last week. (photo credit: JIM BOURG / REUTERS)
US PRESIDENT Donald Trump gestures as he speaks during a rally to contest the certification of the presidential election results by Congress, in Washington last week.
(photo credit: JIM BOURG / REUTERS)
Some 64% of Republican voters said that they would likely join a new political party if former President Donald Trump were to start one, according to a Hill-HarrisX poll that the Hill reported Thursday. The poll also found that 28% of independents and 15% of Democrats said that they would likely join a third party if Trump were to start one.
All told, some 37% of US voters said they were likely to join a Trump third party, according to the poll. 
Some 36% of Republicans said that they were very or somewhat unlikely to join, while 32% said they would very likely join such a party, according to the Hill. 
The poll was conducted among 340 registered voters who responded to it online and has a +/-5.3 point error margin, according to the Hill.
Trump reportedly considered starting a new party last month. The name of the party is expected to be the "Patriot Party." 
Trump has said he may seek the presidency again in 2024, but is currently facing an impeachment trial set to begin during the week of Monday Feb. 8. An impeachment would bar Trump from holding office again.
A Reuters/Ipsos poll released in January found a slim majority of Americans believe Trump should be convicted and barred from holding public office. The responses to this poll were almost entirely along party lines, with nine out of 10 Democrats wanting Trump convicted and less than two in 10 Republicans agreeing.
Trump is the first US president to face impeachment twice. Trump's first impeachment trial, on charges of abuse of power and obstructing Congress after he appeared to pressure the president of Ukraine to investigate Biden and his son, resulted in an acquittal by the Senate, where Republicans held the majority at the time and denied Democrats' attempts to present witnesses.