Genesis 123 conference to celebrate aliyah of Ethiopian Jews

Former Miss Israel Yityish Ayanaw will take part in a Wednesday online discussion aimed to pool together resources from Christian and Jewish communities to restore one of Israel’s ‘Lost Tribes'.

Former Miss Israel Yityish ‘Titi’ Ayanaw (photo credit: GENESIS FOUNDATION 123)
Former Miss Israel Yityish ‘Titi’ Ayanaw
(photo credit: GENESIS FOUNDATION 123)
The arrival of Ethiopian Jews to Israel, an event often described as a return of one of the alleged “Lost Tribes”, will be at the focus of a Wednesday webinar with former Miss Israel Yityish ‘Titi’ Ayanaw, Genesis 123 announced on Friday. 
Ethiopian Jews's arrival to Israel is still ongoing, with roughly 300 community members arriving on Friday. Genesis 123 Foundation President Jonathan Feldstein said that their return story is "unique" and "brings Jews and Christians together in a common purpose." 
He said his foundation is "privileged to launch a program to raise funds for supporting Ethiopian Jews."
Ayanaw, who arrived in Israel as an orphan to eventually become an IDF commanding officer and a successful model, will share her inspiring life story and insights as part of a large-scale, border-crossing effort to aid this historical mission.
"We see the prophetic hand of God in the return of the Jewish people from Ethiopia and wish to support that," Pastor Nicholas Otieno from Nairobi Kenya said.
He added that "as lovers of Israel in Africa, engaging with other brothers and sisters who are part of God's people is extra meaningful." 
"God has given us a love for the Jewish people and for Israel," Pastor Blake Lorenz of Encounter Ministries in Orlando Florida said. 
"We are expressing our love for God's people and fulfilling God's prophetic word that before the Messiah comes, God will gather the lost tribes back to Israel,” he added. 
Ethiopian Jews are unique in the Jewish world for clinging on to their Jewish faith without speaking Hebrew. Their version of the Bible, the Orit, is written in Ge’ez. They also did not celebrate Hanukkah before coming to Israel, strengthening the theory they are descended from Jews exiled after the destruction of the First Temple.
“The rescue of Ethiopian Jews is the first time that black Africans were brought out of oppression into freedom, not the opposite," Church of God in Christ Bishop Glenn Plummer said. 
"Israel should be celebrated. Ethiopian Jews are a great connection between us," he reasoned.
For details on the webinar, click here

The event will take place on Wednesday, February 17 at 9:00 P.M. Israel time (2:00 P.M. Eastern, 11:00  A.M. Pacific time).