New Jewish fundraising campaign launched following Lebanon blast

The aim of the campaign is to raise NIS 1 million for Israeli Flying Aid, a non-profit organization that provides relief for communities stricken by natural distastes or human conflict, according to the organization's website.

The scene of an explosion in Beirut on August 4, 2020. The blast, which rattled entire buildings and broke glass, was felt in several parts of the city.  (photo credit: ANWAR AMRO/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES)
The scene of an explosion in Beirut on August 4, 2020. The blast, which rattled entire buildings and broke glass, was felt in several parts of the city.
(photo credit: ANWAR AMRO/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES)
Only two days after an enormous explosion wiped out large portions of Beirut's port, killing over a hundred people and leaving thousands with various wound degrees, many in Israel have offered to open their hearts and pockets, seeking to provide aid to the victims.
The latest of these efforts is a fundraising campaign, called "Human Warmth," which appeared on JGive platform
The aim of the campaign is to raise NIS 1 million for Israeli Flying Aid, a non-profit organization that provides relief for communities stricken by natural disasters or human conflict, according to the organization's website. 
Israeli Flying Aid specializes, in particularity, in providing aid to communities in countries which do not have diplomatic relations with Israel. 
The money "will be directed to lifesaving aid such as medicine, medical supplies and food for the victims," according to the campaign statement on JGive.
Rabbi Dr. Daniel Roth, Director of Mosaica's Religious Peace Initiative - The Religious Peace Initiative, which is engaged in attempts to promote dialogues between senior Jewish leaders and Islamic leaders from around the Middle East who are not generally inclined to recognize the Jewish state, commented on the Jewish aspects of the new initiative: "the campaign is in line with core halachic Jewish values."
Referring to the Babylonian Talmud, Roth added that "when you see your friend's donkey in need, and your enemy's donkey in greater need, you should help the enemy's donkey that is in a greater need."
Further alluding to fundamental Jewish texts, Rabbi Roth mentioned Proverbs (Mishlay), in which it says that: "If your enemy is hungry, feed him bread, and if he is thirsty, give him water to drink." 
However, not all in the Jewish world believe that this is the right way to act, following on the principle of "the poor of your town come first." But given the scope of the disaster in Lebanon, it is clear why many are inclined to set aside their differences and simply offer a helping hand. 
If the campaign is successful, it could be a major step in the direction of building confidence between the two peoples. 
Israeli government offered immediate assistance to Lebanon, just several hours after learning about the devastating consequences of the explosion and Lebanon's apparent need for foreign assistance.

Tel Aviv Municipality showed solidarity with the Lebanese people by displaying Lebanon's national flag on the municipality's building facade, a move discredited by many social media users from the Arab world.