UNICEF chief calls Syria's Ghouta 'hell on earth' for children

By REUTERS
March 8, 2018 20:18
1 minute read.
Breaking news

Breaking news. (photo credit: JPOST STAFF)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

BEIRUT - The head of the United Nations children's agency UNICEF said on Thursday the besieged Syrian enclave of eastern Ghouta had become a "hell on earth" for children and aid was urgently needed.

"The bombing is almost unceasing and the amount of violence means that the child sees the violence, sees the death, the maiming. And now there is a lack of water and food, so disease is coming on," Henrietta Fore told Reuters in an interview.

Syria's government is two weeks into a fierce assault to retake eastern Ghouta from rebels, saying the offensive is needed to stop insurgent shelling of neighboring Damascus.

The military campaign has killed more than 900 civilians since it began on Feb. 18, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a Britain-based war monitor.

The U.N. Security Council demanded a 30-day ceasefire across all Syria on Feb. 24, but the Syrian government and its ally Russia say the truce does not extend to the rebel groups in eastern Ghouta, which they describe as terrorist.

For the 400,000 people the United Nations says live in eastern Ghouta, the assault has come after years of siege that has caused shortages of food and medicine.

A U.N. aid convoy was allowed into eastern Ghouta on Monday, but some medical supplies were stripped from it, and it had to leave before it had finished unloading because of the fighting.

Related Content

Breaking news
July 17, 2018
Syrian civilians approach Israeli frontier holding white flags

By REUTERS