Iron Age gold hoard discovered in Denmark

The gold was reportedly buried by an Iron Age chieftain back in the sixth century. The stash included lavish jewelry, Roman coins, an ornament, medallions known as bracteates.

 Looted gold coins (photo credit: ISRAEL ANTIQUITIES AUTHORITY PREVENTING ROBBERY UNIT)
Looted gold coins
(photo credit: ISRAEL ANTIQUITIES AUTHORITY PREVENTING ROBBERY UNIT)

A gold hoard weighing approximately one kilogram (2.2 pounds) was discovered in Denmark, Live Science reported on Tuesday. 

The gold was reportedly buried by an Iron Age chieftain back in the sixth century. The stash included lavish jewelry, Roman coins, an ornament and medallions known as bracteates. Some of the artifacts' inscriptions possibly reference contemporary rules of that era, but also some may refer to Norse mythology. 

One finding was a bracteate inscribed with the words "the high one" - which may refer to the Norse mythology god Odin. 

One gold coin depicted Constantine the Great, meaning that it must date back earlier to the Roman Empire. Some Roman coins have been made into jewelry, Vejle Museums stated.

The treasure hunter who made this discovery, Ole Ginnerup Schytz, discovered the hoard in the town of Vindelev on land belonging to his old classmate, the museum also stated. 

Gold hoard buried in Nazi era or just after WW2 found in Germany (credit: REUTERS)Gold hoard buried in Nazi era or just after WW2 found in Germany (credit: REUTERS)

Archaeologists from Vejle Museums stated that the gold was buried in a longhouse, implying that Vindelev was a village of some significance during the Iron Age.

Years ago, archeologists from Vejlemuseerne excavated more gold treasure also dating from the Iron Age period on the Danish island Hjarnø, the museum also stated.  

As of today, more than 40 kg of gold dating back to the Iron Age have been found.