Most Israeli Jews believe Ra'am partnership harmed state security - poll

Over half of the Jewish Israeli public stated that the partnership with Arab party Ra'am harmed Jewish society and Israeli society in general.

 Ra'am head Mansour Abbas attends a a plenum session and a vote on the state budget at the assembly hall of the Israeli parliament, in Jerusalem on November 4, 2021.  (photo credit: YONATAN SINDEL/FLASH 90)
Ra'am head Mansour Abbas attends a a plenum session and a vote on the state budget at the assembly hall of the Israeli parliament, in Jerusalem on November 4, 2021.
(photo credit: YONATAN SINDEL/FLASH 90)

Most right-wing and centrist Israelis believe that the former coalition's partnership with the Ra'am party harmed national security, although centrists and left-wing Israelis largely said that they believe the partnership was positive for economic and civil issues, according to Tel Aviv University's July 2022 Peace Index.

Meanwhile, over half of the Jewish public stated that the partnership with Ra'am harmed Jewish society and Israeli society in general, although a large majority of left-wing voters and half of centrist voters said they think the partnership advanced Israeli society in general.

Among Israeli Arabs, most respondents who expressed an opinion said that partnership advanced Arab and Jewish society and Israeli society in general, although between a quarter and a third of respondents did not express an opinion. Half of the liberal Arab respondents who did express an opinion said they felt the partnership advanced all segments of society, while two-thirds of conservative Arab voters said the same.

Additionally, the Peace Index found that the vast majority of right-wing voters opposed any inclusion of Arab parties in the next coalition, while centrists and left-wing voters mostly supported inclusion. Israeli Arabs largely supported integration, but nearly a third of respondents did not express an opinion.

About a third of both Jewish and Arab respondents said they think that the rightwing members of the coalition caused the government to disintegrate, with this answer being the most common from the right, center and left.

 MK ITAMAR BEN-GVIR addresses the Knesset plenum as Ra’am (United Arab List) Party leader Mansour Abbas presides during a session in November. (credit: OLIVIER FITOUSSI/FLASH90) MK ITAMAR BEN-GVIR addresses the Knesset plenum as Ra’am (United Arab List) Party leader Mansour Abbas presides during a session in November. (credit: OLIVIER FITOUSSI/FLASH90)

How do Jews and Arabs feel about the peace process with the Palestinians?

In terms of the Israeli-Palestinian peace process, the Peace Index found that the level of support for a two-state solution or for the annexation of the territories with limited rights for the Palestinians is almost equal among the Jewish public. For both options, Jewish respondents expressed that it was unlikely that either had a chance of being realized in the foreseeable future.

While three-quarters of the Jewish public feel that continuing the current situation harms Israel, most believe that the situation will continue.

Arab respondents continued to support a two-state solution and oppose annexation in the latest Peace Index, with the most common reply concerning a solution that could be realized in the foreseeable future being the establishment of a Palestinian state. In contrast to the Jewish public, a smaller majority of Arabs believe that continuing the dispute harms Israel.

The latest Peace Index also, for the first time, asked Arab respondents about their views concerning the attitudes of the Jewish public about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, with the responses underestimating how many Jewish Israelis support negotiations with the Palestinians and overestimating how many Jews believe that negotiations will lead to peace.