Candidates reject recount in sloppy Haiti election

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
December 11, 2010 22:20

 
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PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Two top candidates in Haiti's disputed presidential election rejected a proposed re-count, threatening to torpedo a compromise aimed at quelling days of riots and violence over allegations the vote was rigged, their campaigns said Saturday.

The snub by No. 1 finisher Mirlande Manigat and by third-place Michel Martelly leaves the impoverished nation dangerously volatile, with much of the population rejecting the officially announced outcome of the Nov. 28 election and many willing to protest with violence.

Only the ruling party candidate, Jude Celestin, supports the electoral council's offer to retabulate tally sheets from thousands of polling stations around the Caribbean nation.

Blockades and rock-throwing continued in a few areas, but violence had largely subsided in most parts of the capital by Saturday and many people rushed to reopened markets to stock up on food, water, fuel and other supplies in fear that more protests could erupt again.

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, a potential US presidential candidate, shrugged off a US travel warning and arrived in the Haitian capital on Saturday, accompanying evangelist Franklin Graham on a visit expected to include cholera-treatment centers and other projects undertaken by his charity group.


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