Magic mushrooms begin growing in man's blood after injecting 'shroom tea'

The man was discovered by his family days later. He had jaundice, nausea, diarrhea, extreme confusion (unclear whether that was due to the mushrooms or not) and was vomiting blood.

Psilocybin or "magic mushrooms" are seen in an undated photo provided by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) in Washington, U.S. May 7, 2019. DEA/Handout via REUTERs (photo credit: DEA/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS)
Psilocybin or "magic mushrooms" are seen in an undated photo provided by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) in Washington, U.S. May 7, 2019. DEA/Handout via REUTERs
(photo credit: DEA/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS)
A 30-year-old man was hospitalized with severe and bizarre symptoms after he injected himself with a tea made with psilocybin ("magic") mushrooms in an ill-advised attempt to self-medicate, doctors detailed in a case report which was published on Monday in the Journal of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry.
According to the man's family, prior to the hospitalization, he had stopped taking medication for bipolar disorder type 1, after which his moods began to swing wildly between manic and depressive states. 
After doing a little (not very thorough) research online about the practice of microdosing psilocybin mushrooms and LSD as a potential therapeutic for both depression and opioid dependence, the man decided to experiment himself.
However, while there have been several studies which link psilocybin mushrooms (a psychoactive compound and key ingredient in LSD) to relieving symptoms of depression, anxiety and addiction, all studies have so far been done in controlled settings with the drugs taken orally, not intravenously. 
While mushroom tea is traditionally considered a safe way to ingest the drug, the man in this case took the unusual step of drawing the tea through cotton to prepare it for intravenous injection. Due to the poor filtering-power of cotton, the man likely injected directly into his blood much larger than normal amounts of psilocybin, while also injecting himself with a good amount of likely bacteria-ridden water.
The man was discovered by his family days after the injection in serious condition. He had jaundice, nausea, diarrhea, extreme confusion (unclear whether that was due to the mushrooms or not) and was vomiting blood. 
He was brought to the ICU as his lungs and kidneys had already begun to fail, his liver had suffered an acute injury, and his pulse was high due to septic shock (infection-related dilation of blood vessels which causes reduced oxygen flow to the brain).
In the hospital, doctors found mysterious blood clots which they said required further investigation. After taking cultures from the man's blood, the team was shocked to find that "the species of mushroom he had injected was now growing in his blood."
The team also explained that due to the vast injuries the man had incurred, it was not clear whether the extreme confusion he experienced was due to the psychoactive effects of the drug. "It is unclear whether active intravascular infection with a psychoactive fungus such as Psilocybe cubensis may prompt persistent psychoactive effects as seen with ingestion of the same species, which could further contribute to changes in perception and cognition," the report reads.
The man was released after 22 days in the hospital, connected to a ventilator, and has since been put on a steady regimen of two courses of antibiotics and one antifungal treatment.
Last year, psilocybin mushrooms were first legalized for recreational use in the state of Oregon, as well as in the cities of Oakland, California and Denver, Colorado.