‘Arteology’ exhibit showcases archaeology-inspired art at the Western Wall

The exhibit, by Israeli-Canadian artist Nicole Kornberg-Jacobovici, will include clay, stoneware and earthware inspired by Bronze Age Egyptian, Etruscan, Mycenaean and Israelite pottery.

The subterranean exhibition site, part of the ancient water system, Jerusalem Archeological Park (photo credit: ERIC SULTAN)
The subterranean exhibition site, part of the ancient water system, Jerusalem Archeological Park
(photo credit: ERIC SULTAN)

An art exhibition will be opened at an active archaeological site underground for the first time ever in Israel.

The exhibition, called “Arteology: The Power of the Ancients in Contemporary Forms,” will showcase ceramics crafted by Israeli-Canadian artist Nicole Kornberg-Jacobovici from October 12-14 at the Jerusalem Archaeological Park, where Kornberg-Jacobovici's art will adorn the 2,000-year old foundation stones of the Western Wall.

“I have used different clays and different firings such as electric, raku, grill and obvara” said Kornberg-Jacobovici. “I have also used various surface techniques such as carving, stamping and sculpting.”

The exhibit will include clay, stoneware and earthware inspired by Bronze Age Egyptian, Etruscan, Mycenaean and Israelite pottery.

Fusing the contemporary and the ancient

“We’re very proud to provide this special space for Nicole’s ceramics exhibition.”

Dr. Yuval Baruch, head of the IAA Jerusalem District branch

Italian art curator Dr. Cinzia Chiari described Kornberg-Jacobovici's work as “exhibiting the power of the ancients in contemporary forms.”

Art by Nicole Kornberg-Jacobovici for the ‘Arteology’ exhibit (credit: IOSEFA JACOBOVICI)Art by Nicole Kornberg-Jacobovici for the ‘Arteology’ exhibit (credit: IOSEFA JACOBOVICI)
Nicole Kornberg-Jacobovici at work (credit: NAVA JACOBOVICI)Nicole Kornberg-Jacobovici at work (credit: NAVA JACOBOVICI)

Visitors will be able to access the exhibit through the tunnels at the City of David and exit through the Davidson Center.

“We’re very proud to provide this special space for Nicole’s ceramics exhibition,” said Dr. Yuval Baruch, head of the Jerusalem District branch of the Israel Antiquities Authority. “This space was part of the water system of Jerusalem, some 2700 years ago. It’s the first time in Jerusalem that we’ve had an art exhibit in an active archaeological site.”