29% say antisemitism acceptable in workplace, new survey finds

Concerns over the rise of antisemitism in the United States led to heated conversations about the issue.

A RECENT Pew study found that more than 50% of employees don’t want to return to office life. (photo credit: ISRAEL ANDRADE/UNSPLASH)
A RECENT Pew study found that more than 50% of employees don’t want to return to office life.
(photo credit: ISRAEL ANDRADE/UNSPLASH)

ResumeBuilder.com surveyed 1,131 hiring managers in November, asking them about their views of Jewish individuals and their perspectives on antisemitism in the workplace.

What did they find in their survey?

Their survey showed that 26% of hiring managers say they are less likely to move forward with Jewish applicants. When asked why, 38% said that "Jews have too much power and control," which is also tied to another 38% who said, "Jews claim to be the 'chosen people.'"

 Visitors seen standing next to a display of swastika banners at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial museum in Jerusalem on April 26, 2022, ahead of Israeli Holocaust Remembrance Day.  (credit: OLIVIER FITOUSSI/FLASH90) Visitors seen standing next to a display of swastika banners at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial museum in Jerusalem on April 26, 2022, ahead of Israeli Holocaust Remembrance Day. (credit: OLIVIER FITOUSSI/FLASH90)

A few of the other "reasons" were that "Jews have too much wealth", "Jews are greedy", "Jews killed Jesus," and many other antisemitism responses, according to the ResumeBuilder survey.

Another 26% of hiring managers make assumptions about whether or not the applicant is Jewish based on their looks and appearances.

"In this era of fighting for equality in hiring, Jewish individuals have largely been left out of the conversation and the issue of antisemitism has, for the most part, gone unaddressed."

Stacie Haller, executive recruiter and career counselor 

23% said that their company is trying to limit Jewish presence in the workplace. 17% said that their bosses said not to hire Jewish people at all.

In regards to antisemitism among existing workers, 33% said that antisemitism is frequent and 29% said that antisemitism is acceptable within the company they work for.

"This data shows a disturbing number of hiring managers not only admit to having a negative bias against Jewish applicants but also, that they actively want to keep Jews out of their workplace," Stacie Haller, executive recruiter and career counselor said.

"This data shows a disturbing number of hiring managers not only admit to having a negative bias against Jewish applicants but also, that they actively want to keep Jews out of their workplace."

Stacie Haller

"Antisemitism in the workplace starts at the hiring process with individuals who do not want to hire Jews because of bigoted stereotypes, but that is not where it ends. Given that nearly one-third say antisemitism is common and acceptable in their workplace, it's evident that antisemitism is way beyond the hiring process.

"In this era of fighting for equality in hiring, Jewish individuals have largely been left out of the conversation and the issue of antisemitism has, for the most part, gone unaddressed.

"Organizations need to commit to oversight, training and having meaningful conversations about antisemitism. Removing prejudice and ensuring the workplace is equal, fair and accessible for all is not an easy challenge for organizations to tackle, but it's absolutely essential."

What were the questions on the survey?

The survey began by asking if the survey taker was a recruiter, hiring manager, not involved in hiring employees and none of the above.

It then goes in asking which industry the person works in—agriculture, business, construction etc.

The third question on the survey kicks things off by questioning the workplace and antisemitism in the hiring process. "Which of the following, if any, are ways that you come to believe that an applicant is Jewish? Their last name; directly stated by the applicant; their educational background; the applicant has past or current experience with a Jewish organization; their appearance; none of the above; other." The rest of the survey questions are very similar.

Recent concerns about antisemitism

Recently, notable celebrities, such as musician Kanye West and NBA Basketball star Kyrie Irving have been under fire recently for their antisemitic statements, which in turn, comedian Dave Chappelle addressed in his Saturday Night Live skit.

Concerns over the rise of antisemitism in the United States led to heated conversations about the issue.