Scottish Jewish community leader: Independence would not be ‘favorable’ for policy toward Israel

By JERRY LEWIS
September 17, 2014 03:08

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

LONDON – As campaigning for Scotland’s bid for independence from the rest of the United Kingdom starts its final day, Thursday’s voting is too close to call, with opinion polls hedging their bets as to whether the 300-year-old political union may end.

In an exclusive interview with The Jerusalem Post, Paul Morron, president of the Glasgow Jewish Representative Council, declined to make any prediction of the result.

“It’s absolutely on a knife’s edge. You can toss a coin and see which way it comes down,” he said.

However, either a vote for independence, as strongly advocated by the ruling Scottish Nationalist Party (SNP), or a vote for remaining within the union, as campaigned for by all the other UK political parties, will not have any significant effects on the 6,000-7,000-strong Jewish community, Morron said.

Only in one clearly identifiable area will there be a difference — that of foreign policy, especially concerning Israel.

Should Scotland vote “yes,” putting the Scottish Nationalists in the driving seat, “their foreign policy is not likely to be favorable for us,” Morron said.

Related Content

Breaking news
July 23, 2018
Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov to meet Netanyahu today in Jerusalem

By HERB KEINON